AdA Fellowships

Assaf Gruber

© Assaf Gruber

Assaf Gruber

Assaf Gruber (*1980, Jerusalem) is a sculptor and filmmaker who lives and works in Berlin. Both his time-based works and installations focus on the way in which political ideologies of individuals intertwine with personal stories, and the way in which they form social relations within private and public spheres. Gruber is a graduate of the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris and of the Higher Institute of Fine Arts (HISK) in Ghent. He had solo exhibitions at the Museum of Art in Łódź (2015), the Natural History Museum of Berlin (2018), The Berlinische Galerie (2018), the Center for Contemporary Art U-jazdowski Castle, Warsaw (2018) among other institutions. His films have been featured in festivals, including the Berlinale Film Festival, (2016) and FID Marseille (2019).

Gruber researches in the Archive of Avant-garde historical materials for his new film series – The Transient Witness. Each episode portrays the transfer of the archive from the private house of the collector Egidio Marzona in Berlin to its new public domicile – the Japanese Palace in Dresden (part of Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden), through the eyes of a seemingly marginal protagonist.

The project explores the common features and necessary distinctions between art collections, archives, and the various material and cultural substrata that enable their existence.

Michela Lupieri

Michela Lupieri

In her research project Where do we go from here? Michela Lupieri shows the hidden connections between different parts of the archive. Her starting point is our design collection, especially the Italian Memphis movement. The principle of serendipity guides her research. Lupieri looks at the archive's structure in reverse chronological order and beyond the confines of artistic movements, countries and visual languages. In doing so, she follows the interdisciplinary approach of our archive. Her research is grounded in Claire Bishop's theory of dialectic contemporaneity: the idea of contemporaneity as a form of archaeology. The guiding motive of Bishop's research is the feeling, of being radical, a belief that is closely connected with an understanding/imagination of subversivity and distance to traditional rules - both of which are characteristic of 20th century design.

In her second research project "Ideas in the Air" Lupieri explored the horizontal relationships between documents and objects of art in the collection of Egidio Marzona. The inspiration for this project came from Lucy Lippard's concept "Ideas in the Air", from her book Six years: the dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972 (1973). Michela Lupieri looks at crucial artistic ideas and developments in North America and Europe from that time-period as well as the practices in which they manifested. Her goal was to highlight the evolution of objects of art and to analyze their processes of revision. Following the principle of Serendipity, Lupieri looks for objects within AdA, that are connected to the most important exhibitions of that era and which contributed immensely to the transfer of artistic ideas into everyday life. The roles of experimental projects, magazines, catalogues, Mail Art and television are especially relevant for this project.

Michela Lupieri (*1983) is a curator, author and researcher from Italy. She studied Visual Arts at the IUAV University of Venice. She got her M.A. in 2011, specializing in contemporary art and curatorial practices. Since 2018 she is a member of the curatorial team of Palinsesti and in 2019 co-founded Amariana, a cultural association conceived as a platform dedicated to contemporary artistic research and production. In the same year, she worked as associate researcher for the exhibition Rebellische Pracht – Design Punk Statt Bauhaus at Martha Herford Museum. Since September 2021, she is the artistic co-director of Ephemera – festival of Immaterial Culture and lecturer of History of Contemporary Art at ABA UD, Udine. Her curatorial practice revolves around the intersections between art, architecture and public spaces. Since her bachelor thesis on Art Park (Prato d’Arte Marzona), the open-air art collection conceived by Egidio Marzona in Italy, she has worked intensely with the Marzona collection as a curator and researcher. She is currently a PhD candidate at the faculty of TU Dresden with a research project on this collection.

Megan Hoetger

Megan Hoetger

Megan Hoetger (*1984) is an historian, critic, and curator. She holds a PhD in Performance Studies with specializations in Critical Theory and Film Studies from the University of California, Berkeley. She was a Visiting Researcher at the Centre for Cinema and Media Studies in Ghent, Belgium (research on the  EXPRMNTL International Experimental Film Festival, 1949–1974), co-curated “Underground International: Kurt Kren and Tomonari Nishikawa” at the Berkeley Art Museum Pacific Film Archive, and “A Sentimental Punk,” the first retrospective of films by Austrian experimental filmmaker Kurt Kren since 1998, with screenings in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, and Mexico City. She has also organized numerous underground screenings of queer contemporary film in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Her writings on time-based art, archives, and the politics of distribution have appeared in various journals and anthologies.

Hoetger’s archival and curatorial practice maps the political economies in which underground media networks were formed transnationally in relation to state geopolitics and capitalist market forces during the Cold War period. Her first project, Rude & Playful Shadows: Collective Performances of Cinema in Cold War Europe, examined the connections between underground cultural production, the state, and commercial markets across sites in German-speaking Europe (Vienna, Köln, Zurich, Kassel) from the mid-1960s until the late 1970s. In the Archiv der Avantgarden Hoetger is working in the Birgit Hein Vorlass on preliminary research for her new manuscript, Curating and Kinship: Women, Domestic Labor, and Underground Arts Programming in Two Germanys, which turns attention to the relationship between underground cultural production and the women’s movements in West and East Germany between 1973 to 1985.

Fine Kugler

Ausstellungsraum des Künstlers El Lissitsky in Dresden
© Alexander Paul Walther, Repro: Andreas Diesend.

Fine Kugler

Fine Kugler (*1991) studied art history, History, and English/ American Studies at TU Dresden and the University of Leiden, The Netherlands. In 2019, she graduated from Art History with a thesis on a player of the Dresden art market in the time of Weimar Republic. (“Die Kunstausstellung Kühl 1924-1932. Versuch einer Rekonstruktion”).

As a Research Fellow at AdA, she looks at a possible influence of private commercial exhibition making on museum practices. Focussing on the first half of 20th century, she researches the collection of AdA systematically. A key focus therein is on the Avant-Garde movements (El Lissitzky, surrealism) and their impact on displays in museums, galleries and other sales exhibitions.

Meike Beyer

Titelbild (Ausschnitt) von Freccia Futurista, n. 1, hrsg. von Alk Gian, Piero Negri u. Silvestro Lega, Mailand, 19. April 1917.

Meike Beyer

Meike Beyer (*1989) studied art history and Roman studies at the TU Dresden as well as Cultural Heritage: Preservation and Management at the University of Trento (Italy). From 2011 to 2014 she was a member of TU Dresden subproject in the European Network for Baroque Cultural Heritage (ENBaCH) led by the Chair of Italian Literature and Cultural Studies at the Institute of Romance Studies. Since then she works as research assistant at the TU Dresden. Her doctoral research focuses on the Sicilian playwright and poet Ruggero Vasari and his influence on the futuristic network in Germany after 1920.

Following her research interests, including cultural exchange and translation processes as well as socio-cultural networks in the age of the avant-garde, Meike Beyer's Fellowship deals with the Futurist collection of the Archive of Avant-garde (AdA) and wants to explore the transnational interactions between artists through different media. Furthermore, the research focuses on correlations between polymorphic networks of the futuristic movement and literary, artistic, architectural and political spaces of European Modernity after the First World War.

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